March for Our Lives Protest for Gun Control Draws Thousands In NYC

 Photo courtesy of Anastassia Gliadkovskaya

Photo courtesy of Anastassia Gliadkovskaya

It was an unusually lively Sunday morning; thousands of people lined Central Park West, armed with banners that read “NRA--Not ! Representing America” and “#ENOUGH is ENOUGH & TOO MUCH is TOO MUCH.” The March for Our Lives last Sunday drew hundreds of thousands from all over the country to rally support for gun reform, following the most recent deadly high school shooting in Parkland, Fla., last month.

The rally, which started at 10 a.m., featured countless speakers, among them both activists and survivors, who detailed their experiences and expressed the urgent need to take action-- “Vote them out!” was the chant, encouraging the public to vote any members out of Congress who don’t support gun control.

“Fourteen kids dead that will never have the privilege I have of living,” Bonner sobbed. “I don’t want to feel unsafe in school anymore--I want to see change.”

One student, Meghan Bonner, delivered an emotional testimony of experiencing first-hand a school shooting.

“Fourteen kids dead that will never have the privilege I have of living,” Bonner sobbed. “I don’t want to feel unsafe in school anymore--I want to see change.”

Sandy Hook Elementary School library clerk Mary Ann Jacob spoke to the crowd.

“Today, we will send a very clear message to our leaders in Washington that we will not stand idly by as our safety is put at risk by the dangerous agenda of the gun lobby,” Jacob said, evoking cheers. “I am marching today to honor all victims of gun violence.”

“Till then we’ll keep marching”

One protester said, “I would love to change the Second Amendment. I don’t know if that’s going to happen…” Another bystander interjected, “But we’ll start with tighter gun control.”

 Photo courtesy of Anastassia Gliadkovskaya

Photo courtesy of Anastassia Gliadkovskaya

The protesters stated their awareness that tangible change could take years to happen. “Till then we’ll keep marching,” one decidedly said.

Another woman, Mira, emphasized the responsibility of the next generation to take action.

“My expectation is that every person who can vote, will vote… It’s not my generation--it’s yours--you can make a difference, but you have to vote. Or run!”

Parents carried young children on their necks as testimony to the rising generation’s awareness and desire for change.

There hung in the cool air that afternoon an insatiable thirst for change: even if it’s not entirely clear where to begin, society appears ready.