A Profile of Dean Leedy

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When David Leedy came to work as Director of Student Life at The King’s College during the summer of 2000, the school was only one year old.  Over the past decade, this man became vital in expanding the size of the school from 17 students to 700.  He was also influential in developing the school’s trademark house system and honor code and as of this academic school year, Leedy has been promoted to his new role as Dean of Students.

The offer came when predecessor Eric Bennett accepted his new role as VP of Student Development and needed somebody to take over his old position.

"David was a shoe-in for a position with Student Development more than a decade ago," Bennett said. "In over twenty-three years of work in the field of education, I have known other professionals with talent equivalent to David's, but many of them lacked his abiding commitment to Jesus and his relentless integrity. He is, without a doubt, one of the most remarkable men with whom I've had the privilege to work."

Surprisingly, despite this support, Leedy did not immediately accept the job.

“I actually fought it in a way,” said Leedy.  “I already had so many responsibilities on my plate that I just didn’t feel like I could take on any more.”

Eventually, however, Leedy “gave in and decided to do what was best for King’s.”

Now that he’s settling into the job, Leedy explains that it’s not as overwhelming as what he’d originally expected.

“It is a lot of responsibility, but I love it,” said Leedy.  “It’s definitely demanding, but nothing that I can’t handle.  It also helps immensely that I have a great team of motivated individuals working underneath me.”

Leedy went on to explain how although the Dean of Students is ultimately responsible for all things related to student life at the school, he is not alone in this endeavor.

In fact, Leedy explained how he spends the majority of his time as Dean “supporting and empowering leaders who take specific aspects of student life into their own hands.”

For example, instead of personally organizing and directing the King’s house system, Leedy leaves directional responsibility in the hands of the elected student leaders.  Leedy then communicates with these leaders and makes available to them whatever funding or resources they need to better the house system for the students at King’s.

“My job would be a lot more difficult if I didn’t have such an amazingly competent group of people to work with,” Leedy explained.  “But everyone knows exactly what they need to do and get it done without me having to tell them.  It makes the job a lot easier on me.”

With less trivial distractions, Leedy explained how he’s now able to focus more concretely on his one overlapping goal of “creating the absolute best student life experience in the nation.”

Leedy explained that he loves King’s because it is uniquely dynamic and engaging.

“No other school in the nation is doing what we are,” Leedy said.  “And although we’re not quite the best yet, we’re well on the way.  We’ve come a long way in the past six years and are still building.  I’m excited to see what directions this school can go in over the next few years.”

MiscRobert Punchur