Posts tagged Museum
Saint, Warrior, or Lunatic: Art Review of Bastien-Lepage of Lorraine’s “Joan of Arc”

I walk through the wide-framed, grey walls of Gallery 800, the Rodin Gallery, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Detailed forms of human statues, made of various bronze and clay materials, are riddled throughout. But in the hallway right outside the gallery my eyes stop, mesmerized. A teenage woman with a face of piercing dedication and purity stands in a lonely looking garden. The plaque reads: Bastien-Lepage of Lorraine’s “Joan of Arc.”

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Art & the City: Four Galleries in One Night

Nightlife is endless in New York City. For a college student on a budget, however, the city most definitely has a bedtime. When ramen noodles are the only thing in the pantry, and the refrigerator is close to bare, it’s difficult for students to find something to do on a Friday night that doesn’t break the bank.Or maybe, we are simply not looking in the right places. The other day, I saw four different art exhibitions in one night. I mixed and mingled with art curators, hipsters, and all it cost me was a subway ride. Here is where I ended up.

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A Look into the Psyche of Kusama: "Infinity Mirrors" Opens in New York City

Kusama’s artistic endeavours have spanned some of the most important art movements of the second half of the twentieth century including Minimalism and Pop art. At 89 years old, Kusama continues to impress audiences of all age-ranges. As an avant-garde artist, Kusama’s work is diverse and unique, containing sensory, utopian, hallucinatory, and obsessive themes.

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Rodin at the Met

Rather than gathering an awe-inspiring collection of the most expensive and striking Rodin sculptures, it feels as if the curators made a scrapbook of his life.  I found myself smiling at the paintings as I learned about who Rodin was, how he worked, and what his friends thought of him.

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The Newcomers: Ambulatory Plywood Art

Each morning the habitation form of the structure is disassembled and over the course of the day, reassembled in order to become a bridge to the next day’s supplies before turning back into a shelter against the cold November nights. Their route is marked along the plaza by a series of poles atop small caches of supplies for the next day, and their progress is shown by a string of lights along the top of the poles.

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